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Spiders » Burton Pest Control

The Spiders of Portland

Spider’s diets consist primarily of living insects, or at times, even other spiders. A common way to categorize spiders is how they hunt their prey. Spiders hunt by building webs ("web-building" spiders) or by actively hunting ("wandering" spiders).

Let's begin with spiders we might find in our homes here in the Portland area because these are the ones that live among us, yuck. Most of these spiders typically live in yards and gardens around houses, but many times enter homes and garages while looking for prey, a mate, or a place to lay their eggs.

"Web-building" spiders construct webs to capture prey. Some species build webs that capture flying or aerial prey (the orb-weavers and cobweb weavers), while other species build webs on or near the ground to capture wandering insects (the sheet web or funnel web spiders). Web-building spiders typically stay within their webs, but adult males will wander in search of adult females.

Long-bodied Cellar Spider

These long-legged spiders build loose and tangled-looking webs in which they hang to catch their prey. They prey on anything that enters their web — which is often other spiders.

These spiders can be found most of the year hanging from their webs in corners of dimly lit rooms. They are especially common in cellars, garages, in stairwells or under stairs, and in other less frequently used areas of houses. These spiders are more common inside than in your garden.

long-bodied-cellar-spider

False Black Widow

These long-legged spiders build loose and tangled-looking webs in which they hang to catch their prey. They prey on anything that enters their web — which is often other spiders.

These spiders can be found most of the year hanging from their webs in corners of dimly lit rooms. They are especially common in cellars, garages, in stairwells or under stairs, and in other less frequently used areas of houses. These spiders are more common inside than in your garden.

false-black-widow-spider

Hobo Spiders, Barn Funnel Weavers and Giant House Spider

Three species of funnel web spiders are found in Portland-area homes. These are the barn funnel weaver, the giant house spider, and the hobo spider.

All of these spiders build funnel type webs in dark, moist areas such as in woodpiles, under rocks, or in basements.

These spiders vary greatly in size, with the giant house spider the largest of the three species (some are as large as the palm of your hand!).

Funnel-web spiders sit in their webs, often within the funnel portion, and wait for prey to enter their webs. The spiders that people encounter in their homes are adult males, looking for females.

When and Where to Find: Males are most commonly seen during July–September when they wander in search of females. Indoors, they are most frequently hide in dimly lit areas such as in boxes, closets, and storage areas.

hobo-spider-or-brown-recluse